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big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i think this is the number one sold on amazon.com and it is riveting to show how does organization has managed to infiltrate into various capitals throughout the western world and it has managed to come under the obama administration, metastasize and so without any further ado i would like to introduce you to a wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank you for hosting this event. i look at sera as a modern-day esther or deborah. such a time as this. thank you for having me here. if you write a book, you spend a year with that and say this book can put me through pack. but i think that people are reading it. it gets into detail about the main player in the arab spring, which i refers to as the islamist winter in the butt. the muslim brotherhood is done, out of power in egypt, we don't have to worry about them. this is the postmortem of history. it has been has the muslim brotherhood, the leaders were killed and imprisoned in the group was banned for decades. the headquarters was burned to the ground. c
in his book, i try to love america. but i cannot love things. no one in good health can. imagine a world of material wealth is devoid of people. i try to love america and its people, the dominant majority, their depiction of me and their treatment of mine. i have had to try to love america but they would not love the african whole of me. thus i could not love america. i have come to know that i have tried to love america's ideals and promise and process. these things could mean no more to me than they have to those that conceived them were written on were cited and ultimately betrayed them. then i stopped trying to love america. with that has come a measure of unexpected contentment that is settled upon me like an ancient ceremonial robe, warm and splendid, mislead but valued all the more for its belated retrieval. randall robinson, thank you for being with us. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics
know, but what we do now. it's a question of american resolve, and america's place in the world. >> our concern with the cause of the defenseless people of syria, is about choices that will directly affect our role in the world and our interests in the world. it is also profoundly about who we are. we are the united states of america. we are the country that has tried not always successfully, but always tried to honor a set of universal values around which we have organized our lives and our aspirations. this crime against conscious, this crime against humanity, this crime against the most fundamental principles of international community, against the norm of the international community, this matters to us. >> and a little while after that, president obama spoke at the white house ahead of a meeting with balkan leaders -- pardon me, baltic leaders. he said there's no open-ended commitments being discussed. there's no american boots on the ground in syria. he did not make a decision but he did express that he wished the international community had already acted and lamented the fact that
to the middle east that's different from america. he takes pride in that and on the basis of that he's made allies. to give snowden, a highly symbolic figure given the surveillance issue would have collided with what putin's done in international affairs. but at home he has a political elite. forget society. the political elite didn't want him to make this concession to the united states. >> rose: we conclude with julian guthrie, a journalist who has written a book about larry ellison called "the billionaire and the mechanic." it details the story of his quest for the america's cup. >> and it was expected that larry would partner with a better-known yacht club on san francisco's waterfront, the st. francis yacht club. and there's a fun story in the book about what happened or what didn't happen between the st. francis and larry ellison. but it's a story that doesn't come along very often and i became became very enamored with the drama of the two men before i became interested in the america's cup. >> rose: egypt, russia and the america's cup when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose c
. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis -- >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviolent coordinating committee, and he was 23 years ol
transformed america. she lives in williamstown, massachusetts with jim burns and their dog, roosevelt, and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note, for one thing, she's a great friend of the library and me as well, but james mcgreggor burns is the dean of scholars writing the first two full editions of radio vet's biography yearings ago, and he's watching the prasm later. we want to send the best to him in massachusetts. [applause] with that, pleased to introduce susan dunn. [applause] have you seen "foreign correspondence" starring herbert marshall? many of the students have not heard of al fred hitchcock or joel mccia, but you may know them. "foreign correspondent" debuted in the summer of 1940, and in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks his lackadaisical reporter, johnny jones, a question, what's your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis, says the reporter, played by joel. i'm referring to the war, mr. jones. oh, that, well, to tell you the truth, i've not begin it much thought. you don't keep up with the foreign news, do you? well how would you li
will start with violence in egypt. bret stephens and peter beinart disagree as usual. >>> then, is america overregulated? does the government have altogether too much of a say in how we live our lives? i'll ask the man who put many of the obama administration's regulations in place, cass c sunstein. >>> also underneath the violence, is the arab world the new start-up society? that's what an american venture capitalist believes. and while we're at innovation, is north korea going to beat apple at its own game? obviously no, but i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. if there is one crisis that both the american left and right agree is real, it is of declining mobility. the american dream is at heart that someone no matter his or her background can make it in this country. a few weeks ago, four economists at harvard and the university of california at berkeley released a path-breaking study of mobility within the united states. and last week, the "journal of economic perspectives" published a series of essays tackling the question from an international perspective. the research is ca
to the scientists and allowed america to take the lead and develop the atomic bomb. by the time the bombs were dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki the british role in all of this have been completely forgotten. the sad part of the story is later in his life churchill who was kind of dismissed with nuclear technology throughout his career as a politician suddenly becomes aware of how destructive and how dangerous it is existentially. he only had that realization 20 years earlier it would have reshaped what became a nuclear arms locally. at the time i think he was just really unaware of the potentiality of atomic energy and dismissed it and kept saying i'm very happy with explosives we are to have. >> lara heimert a lot of the conversation here at bookexpo america this year is about e-books still. does basic have been approached to e-books? have they been helpful to your business? >> we love e-books. we love it when people have more ways to read books and what we find is a lot of people toggle between the two. they don't become exclusive e-book readers and don't assert their bookshelves. i use my
.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply and labor demand. all of those questions do not require amnesty. you can get all of the economic benefits that people talk about in fixing our broken immigration system without giving amnesty at this time. that is the position we support. unfortunately in this environment right now, the moment something passes the house, the pressure on immigration, which has dissipated over the last couple of weeks and months, will immediately be back in the forefront. >> you can watch the entire interview with michael needham of heritage action form for america on newsmakers -- on "newsmakers" sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern and 6:00 p.m
brotherhood. it's called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i am a slow reader, but i went through read in one afternoon because i could not put it down. it is such a page turner. i think number one on amazon in terms of books about the middle east. it is reading to show how this organization that was established in 1929 has managed to infiltrate into various capital throughout the restaurant -- the western world and unfortunately into our very own. it has managed to, under the obama administration, metastasize and has been influencing power. without any further ado are like to introduce you to have wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank sarah for a first of all hosting this event and the endowment for middle east troops has such phenomenal work. i looked at sarah as a modern-day esther, deborah. i really do. such a time as this to thank god for the organization and when you're doing and think of revving a year. you don't want to look at it. i know people are reading it. this is really the first book since the so-called arab spring broke out that get
sought to pursue taking america into the second world war. and as michael explained, that changed the course of history as we know in very dramatic ways and in particular the role of america in very dramatic ways. and so the story is a fascinating one of itself. it's told beautifully by michael in a way that takes you into the rooms where the decisions were being made and the conversations were being had that shaped the course of history. but it also has i think important lessons about statecraft, about the way in which presidents of with great difficulty nevertheless can turn the american state and new and profoundly important directions. therefore it has relevance for today as well. michael was the director of the institute for international policy in sydney australia where he does a great job of leading that institution, which has become under his leadership the premier think tank on international policy and australia. as i said, she was formerly year as a senior fellow in the foreign policy program. he previously directed the global issues program at the institute and before t
with pulitzer prize winning author james mcgreger burns of the three roosevelt leader who transformed america. she lives in massachusetts with jim burns and their dog roosevelt. and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note, for one thing, susan is a great friend of the library and me as well. james mcgrayinger burns is the roosevelt scholar. he wrote the first volume of biography. he's in williamstown, massachusetts, and will be watching the program later. we want to send our best to him in williamstown, massachusetts. [applause] so with that, i'm pleased to introduce sue san dunn. -- susan dunn. [applause] >> thank you, bob. it's a great treat and great privilege to be speaking in this magical place. have you ever seen alfred hitchcock's movie "foreign correspondent"? it made the debut in the summer of 1940. in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks him flip what is your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis said the reporter played by joel. i'm referring to the war, mr. jones. oh, that. well to tell you the truth, i haven't given it much thought. you don'
the past 50 years. today america has its first black president. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- >> and african americans do routinely hold top posts like secretary of state, attorney general, national security advisor. top corporations like merck, american express, mcdonald's and xerox have had or have now black ceo's. oprah winfrey is america's second black billionaire, following in the footsteps of publishing mogul robert l johnson. african americans are among the country's top sports stars and celebrities in fields one restricted by racing, swelling the ranks of black millionaires. yet in other ways america is far from king's dream. racial divides persist in income, educational achievement, and poverty. question, are we less conscious of race today than in 1963, more conscious of race today, or are things about the same? pat buchanan. >> i think we're probably more conscious right now, john, but i was at the march on washington. i was up there in the lincoln memorial when dr. king gave that address. and it was a moment really when the cresting of the civil rights movement,
muhamed who had sworn to love this as an immigrant and army sergeant enlistee to america looks at him and says i love bin laden. i don't need a wad to attack america. i've ex-met number of sleepers that i kid activate. as matthew and he walks out of the restaurant. he said that's the most dangerous man i've ever met and we cannot leave him on the street and yet they left him on the street for x. max number of months. the bombs go off in africa 200 some dead in and they wait a month. they finally arrest him and when they go to rest and guess what they do click they get them in a motel room in new york and they let him go to the bathroom. police 101. for anyone who has ever worked csi miami or dragnet noses as soon as you put the cuffs on somebody you search them or whatever. before they put the cuffs on them they let him go to the bathroom and he later admitted that he flushed key and permission down the toilet including alza were he's location the number two guy in al qaeda and guess what happened to ali muhamed? he is a john doe warrant for weeks and months because they don't want th
sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. there's hardly a sentient grown-up in this country who isn't aware that our economy is no longer working for vast numbers of everyday people. the rich and powerful have more wealth and power than ever. everyone else keeps losing ground. between 2009 and 2011 alone, income fell for 99% of americans, while it rose 11% for the top 1%. since the worst of the financial crisis, that top 1% has captured the increases in income while the rest of the country has floundered. stunning, isn't it? the behavior of many of those one percenters brought on the financial crisis in the first place. we turned around and rescued them, and now their wealth is skyrocketing once again. at the bottom, working people are practically flat on their back. we talk a lot about what's happening to the middle class, but the american dream's really become a nightmare for the poor. just about everyone has an opinion about the trouble we're in. the blame game is at fever pitch in
of the south asian political dynamic in america. that was my first event at the forum. and those it is right feel most at home here in new york in drew is modest because these books and we have done together starting over one decade ago when we will talk about why the meeting of the world social forum it was a world conference against racism and intolerance and discrimination so why was there such chaos come on the stage of the left? there never seems to be a coherent agenda. we have so many different issues in there and able to fight a united horizon. not a single horizon but some kind of unity but the first time we talk about this i said i would write a book about it be over 100 pages because of durbin was in danger of being forgotten. faugh five all that work that went to put together this major conference was in danger of the loss. i remember we matt and i said i cannot publish his book because it is a book of defeat it does not recognize there is no future for the movement. it is a swan song that never came together. said then went back where is the dynamic? what about in the venues lik
, i think we could not be in a much better place than america to have this discussion right now. i am joined by a fabulous panel of experts. usy are going to enlighten and him pack the relationship between growth in texas. many have probably seen him on tv. it ordered member of the wall street journal, he writes about immigration, taxes, many things. i am sure you have read his articles. he has been an advocate for years, a scholar, and we are privileged to have you here, steve. thank you for coming. youthing you do well is look state-by-state a lot. you talk about growth and you look at the state and evidence. and what are growing role are immigrants playing in the country? >> first of all, when amity called me and asked me to come here to dallas to speak, i leapt amthe opportunity, because i an admirer of george w. bush. thank you for the invitation. thunder a little bit when you talk about four percent growth year it i would add to what you said, that i do not think we can accomplish four percent growth without immigration. it is a precondition to get to that higher growth rate. it
africa, central and latin america and a majority of asia and discusses the possibilities for an alternative system to emerge. this is about two hours. >> okay. thank you, max. thanks to the brecht forum for hosting us, thanks to all of you for coming out. i am andy, i'm an editor at verso books, and we are the proud publishers of vijay's new book, "poorer nations." i'm going to just briefly introduce vijay. he's going to talk about his book for a bit, then we're going to have a q&a. i'll kick it off with a few questions, then we're going to turn it over to you. and as max said, we have to -- we're hoping to, you know, wait for the mic to get to you, and this is going to be recorded, it'll play on booktv on c-span at some point in the future, which is exciting. i get the feeling that a lot of people here know vijay, but just for those who don't, a little bit of bio about vijay prashad. vijay is the edward saed chair, very appropriate, at the american university of beirut right now. he was formerly and for a long time the george and martha kellner chair of south asian studi
-author with james mcgregor burns of the three leaders who transformed america. she lives in massachusetts with jim burns and their dog, roosevelt, and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note for one thing, susan is a great friend of the library and of me as well, but james mcgregor burns is the dean of roosevelt scholars writing the first two biographies many, many years ago, and he's back in williamstown, massachusetts, and he'll be watching the program later, so we want to send best to him and william penn, massachusetts. [applause] so with that, i'm pleased to introduce susan dunn. [applause] >> thank you, bob. it's a great treat and great privilege to be speaking in this magical place of hyde park. have you ever seen alfred hitchkoch's movie, "foreign correspondence" starring herbert marshall? many of the students have not heard of these -- [laughter] but you may know them. it made a debut in the summer of 1940. in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks his lackadaisical reporter, johnny jones, a question. what's your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis s
is an example of what made america great. courage to confront hard shot and abuse, determination to move past and gratitude to a country that made it possible for anyone to succeed and discover one's self worth. .. >> she has also written articles for the "wall street journal," national tribune, los angeles times, "the weekly standard," and others. currently, ms. ma is a vice president of the advisory firm, and she's the policy adviser of the heartland institute, a free market think tank. it is my pleasure to introduce ying ma. [applause] >> thank you, all, thank you so much. rita, thank you very much for the kind introduction. i want to say thanks to all the volunteers who made this event happen, special thanks to rita for all her hard work, coordination in recent months, and, howard, thank you for having me here. it's an honor for me to tell you a bit about my book and my story, but whenever i talk about my book, i have a tendency to think of another author, and that author is president barack obama. as you may recall, the liberal media raved about barack obama's writing abilities in the 20
most of what america offers, to a situation where at least you're closer to a decent minimum life." >> are you suggesting then that there is no economic reason why those at the bottom should not share in the gains of economic growth? >> absolutely. there is no economic reason. and in fact, i would go further. we know, for example, that the lower the income of a family, the more likely it is to cut corners on the education of their children because they don't have the resources. so, here's an immeasurable question about the minimum wage. how many young people who are born into a minimum wage family, that is it's so low as we have it today, will never get the kind of educational opportunities, the kinds of educational supports, to be able to realize their own capabilities and to contribute to our society? that alone is a reason, whether you think of it in terms of the long-term benefit of the country, or you just approach it as a moral question or an ethical question. by what right do you condemn a whole generation of young people to be born into families whose financial circumstanc
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
comcast "global crossings" immigration, civilization and america by alvaro vargas llosa comes at a perfect moment and it puts immigration in historical context showing how so much of the debate today is not actually new in american politics and that we can be guided by a lot of american experience, long american experience. it's better to let the author talk to us about that. my good friend alvaro vargas llosa is the senior fellow at the center for global prosperity at the independent institute who publishes -- who has published this book. he has been a nationally syndicated columnist for the "washington post" writers group. he has been the author of numerous books including the che guevara risk and the guide to perfect latin american idiot which was a bestseller in the spanish edition in latin america. he is a big what has in his columns that appear throughout latin america every week and has contributed to leading newspapers in the united states. he has been a board member of the "miami herald" publishing company and an op-ed page editor and columnist for the "miami herald." i could go o
lyons recounts the introduction of the enlightenment to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its development. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. [laughter] that's always good to hear a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, my wife and i have only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we're based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and i'll probably always miss, and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book and most of my three earlier books as well. but i know that quality of life and the quality of discourse, particularly civic discourse, will be greatly improved. [laughter] and i know, also, that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that i'm speaking here tonight, and he would commend this institution on its civic-mindedness. franklin was known as a projector, that is he loves social projects, and
electricity to gas to extend your driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. ♪ the 2013 volt. charge ahead of the rest in the hov lane. ♪ >>> myth number 5, our drinking water is in danger was r because oil companies frack. frack? what's that? >> end fracking now. >> the controversy is over chemicals being injected into the earth to break up rock and release natural gas. >> fracking means shoving water and chemicals into the ground, fracturing the rock to release oil and gas. this has been done for 60 years. but recently, geologists learned how to drill sideways. result? america now has much more and, therefore, cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon, america may be self sufficient in energy. also, if you're worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> fracking feels wrong. it feels like you're pumping stuff into mother earth. but it's an amazing story. >> a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to
at this point in time in america. >> she is not political, she is not speaking out politically the way that abigail did with her husband. she is not a public political figure speaking out on these things. she has her own private views on some things. her views on politics are more about how people behaved. she is much more interested in everyone conducting themselves properly. even people on her own side. she doesn't like it when people who support the policies that her husband supported have crossed a line in terms of decorum. she is not trying to get out -- she's not an activist. i would not want to say that. >> nearly 100 years until women have the right to vote, we should point out for our younger viewers. what role could they play? where did their power come from? >> there is a coda to this story. just as john quincy became more and more outspoken in his opposition to slavery, and famously played a role in the amistad case. there was something between louisa and the green key sisters, who were pioneering activists and abolitionists of their day. i think she comes as close there as
to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its develop and. this is a little over one hour. >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. it's always good to get a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, i wife and i only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we are based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book, most of my three or their books as well. but i know the lord of life and quality of discourse will be greatly improved. and i know also that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that if speaking here tonight and that he would commend this institution on its civic mindedness. franklin was what was known as a projector. he loves -- loud projects, social projects. knowledge was a social activity and that was exemplified by the program get here at town hall. i do have to say one thing. i think he would probably frown
picture", "take the risk" in the newest book "america the beautiful" 2011. dr. carson, how do you get from "gifted hands" to "america the beautiful" were you begin by asking a philosophical policy question whether or not we are still following the vision of the founding fathers? >> guest: a very good question. i never intended but after the twin operation a lot of people wanted me to talk about the operation. if he then they wanted to hear about my background and people were flabbergasted it is interesting how all worked out because everybody gets their 15 minutes of fame but my first 15 minutes had to do with how to remove half the brain may second 50 minutes with your leader had to do with operating on the babies while still in the mother's womb. and then there is the third 50 minutes i said the media is not stupid. then they will want to look into my background. are you kidding me? end of course, that is what happened. then a lot of publishers said you should write a book. i said i want to write a book. after about the tenth publisher i said i should write a book. so i wrote "gifted han
, what we associate with the socialist leading liberal democracies in europe and more and more in america. i turn that soft liberalism. that is what we're going to focus on today. in order to understand the claims it will have to do a history of liberalism. wishing to fair worshiping the state is a history of liberalism as a blueprint for a bigger history that we need to sort out all of the confusions that we find. so i'm going to try to provide a clear understanding of what liberalism is in its essence. actress it back 500 years to machiavelli as the founder of modern liberalism. so we need to do a lot of history to understand. when we look at the roots of modern liberalism, what we find is said to a movement which the fis will liberalism really has been over the centuries in one form or another, simultaneously a rejection of christianity because it occurs within the christian context, and the simultaneous embrace of this world as the highest bid. of this material world as our ultimate and only home. now, liberals in america today are the intellectual heirs of this twofold desire or free
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
130 hijackings in america. sometimes at a rate of more than one a week. sometimes two a day. i was looking for a story i could explore more deeply. i was looking for people who have been fugitives from years after hijacking planes. i was looking at the list of people who are still on the run, and it was pretty much an all-male crew. sunday i saw this one woman's name, cathy kerkow, a 21 year woman from small town in oregon. i was just intrigued. i thought what would make this 20 year old woman turned her back on everything she had ever known to hijack a plane to a foreign country and never be able to come home again? so that kind became a four-year obsession for me, a long journey to tell that story. i'm going to start by telling not about her story and the story of her accomplice, a more about the general history of hijacking in america. as she started in 1961 was the first hijacking in america, may 1, 1961. a cuban exile with out a statement on the miami to key west flight and told the pilot that he wanted to go to havana to warn the dell cast about an assassination attempt.
it be in america there was a sting. now that you understand you have more of a dialogue. realistically we stopped talking to our young people. hopefully it open to dialogue to take time and talk to her children. and listen to them and start by saying something like hello or giving a smile. i always say on a personal note it's an eye-opener and something we need to continue to try to embrace in our children and our community because it starts with us. thank you. >> thank you very much. >> i just want to say that that synergy i spoke of having all these organizations and these institutions all have to work together. i think that is key and perhaps your organization could be the one that starts the ball rolling and starts the communication but i think that does have to happen. >> as long as we can get some cards from you and you could give us some support that would be great. >> if i could add to that quickly also. one common thread through all of our work is we look to history and different kinds of history to find instances of structural oppression, the structural violence and racism and responses
been done for 60 years. but recently, geologists learned how to drill sideways. result? america now has much more and, therefore, cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon, america may be self sufficient in energy. also, if you're worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> fracking feels wrong. it feels like you're pumping stuff into mother earth. but it's an amazing story. >> a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut its greenhouse gas i'm missiemissiot didn't cut them much. >> in europe we only managed to cut half when you guys accidentally stumbled to do in fracking. >> fracking is cheaper, plentiful. maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> end fracking now! end fracking now! >> they worry about energy companies shoving these dangerous chemicals into the ground. >> this is a scene from an anti-fracking documentary called "gasland." >> for the documentary featuring "gasland," john fox. >> hollywood gave the director an emmy and matt damon's la
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
mcfarland, and author of the knewly released book, "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy," thank you, both, for being here. >> thank you. >> thank you. lou: kt, starting withyou, the idea that the president wants to return, the administration wants to return to a democratically elected president, which is precisely what the egyptian people have demonstrated they want no more of after a year, think you would know more. >> well, those are not the actions anymore. the actions is can the military establish some kind of order because the option is not military against democracy. it's the military maybe gets a little bit of order going, or you have chaos and potentially another civil war. i thought, by the way, the introduction was great. you set up the fact that we were for the mubarak government before we were against them, and then we were for the morsi government before we against it, and for the military government before we were against it now. lou: thank you, and te with the -- the "we" referred there is a reference to the obama admistration. eric, in the book, you call
panel people. and as mayor as one of the finite cities in america why are you supporting immigration >> thank you carl. let me repeat my hangz or thanks for julia and kevin. this is the first company i visit in this city and carl thank you. and the carl bishop group is very important working with our chamber of commerce and the other nonprofit. a simple answer is jobs. the reason i'm working on immigration reform. i used to be a civil rights attorney and helped folks to 0 reunite with their families. but at the time the direction connect to the history of the city being a city of immigrants 35 percent of all the small businesses in san francisco was owned by an immigrant. our whole history this city's been built on good immigrants who found ideas and employed others. and today that story has not changed. i think that the businesses in succeed if we have good sound business policies but we make sure there's comprehensive immigration reform. because we've he learned over the years is that there are millions of people in the state of california and undocumented folks in san francisco t
on the country did states of america coming out of the closet and singing here is how i think the social war should be taught. should be taught in terms of people understanding on what would have happened if the war turned out differently. >> up next on the special weeknight edition of book tv. author national book award winning author nathaniel philbrick -- he discusses this in massachusetts for 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. it's an honor to be introduced by a fellow nantucketer both of our kids were educated by them and it is great to see you here in brookline and it's wonderful to be in the coolidge center theater with this great bookstore and co-sponsored with the massachusetts historical society, which has been an institution that has been absolutely essential to my life as a historian. i sometimes sort of feel like i've taken up residence in the archives there, and every book i've done there has been a central information that has come from there but among the more so than bunker hill. one of the characters i delve into, the papers are there at what we call the mhs and it is an
and -- >> the constitution of the united states of america. >> undermining the rule of law. >> this is the law. this is the law of the land that was passed in a democratic process. >> what the president has done is not in this law. the president does not have -- >> what is this? >> the article 2, section 3 of the constitution says the president will faithfully implement the law, not change the deadlines for the law or pick and choose which parts of the law he executes. and that is what this president -- >> that's a big discussion. >> that is a big discussion for another -- a separate discussion for another night. >> very bad for business. thank you so much, as well, a real pleasure. >> my pleasure. >> a new study says about half the people who right now pay for their own health insurance will qualify for federal tax credits under obama care. the rest of the people will likely have to pay more than they are already. remember what mitt romney said? >> 47% of the people who vote for the president no matter what, there are 47% who are with him, who are dependent upon him, who believes they're vict
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